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Get cooking with The Canadian Diabetes Association’s 2017 Healthy Living Calendar now!

Get cooking with The Canadian Diabetes Association’s 2017 Healthy Living Calendar now!
Picture of Denise Barnard
Posted by: Denise Barnard
Posted on: September 26, 2016

The CDA’s 2017 Healthy Living Calendar is here! The 12 delicious recipes, which celebrate the diverse culinary traditions of Canadians living with or affected by diabetes, are accompanied by gorgeous photos. You’ll also find helpful health tips from registered dietitians who volunteer or work with the CDA.

Calendars are free; all you pay is the cost of shipping. To order, visit Shop CDA and choose “Magazines, Books and More!” If you have any questions about orders, e-mail orders@diabetes.ca. The online version is also available for download. Enjoy!

Do you have a personal story of how diabetes has touched your life or that of someone you know? Fill in our easy personal story submission form, and you and your story could appear in myCDA community content.

Do you have a favourite recipe from one of our calendars or our recipes section? Visit our myCDA community forums and share it now.




Really think diabetes is nothing to be concerned about? Think again.

Picture of Denise Barnard
Posted by: Denise Barnard
Posted on: September 20, 2016

With one in three Canadians already living with diabetes or prediabetes, there’s no doubt about it: diabetes is an epidemic. That means you or someone you know could be at risk. So what can you do? As part of the Canadian Diabetes Association’s “Really?” diabetes awareness campaign, we ask you to take the Canadian Diabetes Risk (or CANRISK) questionnaire to find out your risk of type 2 diabetes, and tell your friends and family, too. It’s easy: click diabetestest.ca to get started. Knowing your risk can help you make healthy changes now to potentially prevent type 2 diabetes.  To talk about your test results, visit your doctor, pharmacist, or another health-care professional. To learn more about diabetes, visit diabetes.ca. The “Really?” campaign runs from Sept. 19 to Dec. 11 in partnership with Sun Life Financial and with support from Novo Nordisk Canada.

Do you have a personal story of how diabetes has touched your life or that of someone you know? Fill in our easy personal story submission form, and you and your story could appear in myCDA community content.

Do have a story about how knowing your diabetes risk has affected you? Visit our myCDA community forums and share it now.





A day in the life of a single mom raising two kids with type 1 diabetes

A day in the life of a single mom raising two kids with type 1 diabetes
Picture of Denise Barnard
Posted by: Denise Barnard
Posted on: September 12, 2016

In March 2009, my world changed. My second daughter, Adrianna, who was then four years old, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Five years later, Joey, one of my twin boys, was also diagnosed at the age of five.

Everyone living with diabetes needs a support network, and that’s even more crucial for children living with type 1 diabetes. I am proud of all of my children. With Adrianna and Joey, I am proud how they have learned to live and get on with their lives while coping with diabetes. As a parent, I have played my part, along with my other children, Maya and Ezra. Here’s what life looks like on a typical day of a 24/7/365 disease with no days off or vacations.

3 a.m. I wake up and do a blood sugar test on Adrianna and Joey. While they can be half-asleep, I need to check that their blood sugar does not go too low. This can happen during the night. If their readings are low, I wake them up and have them take some sugar and then recheck their blood sugar until it goes into normal range. Then back to bed for a few hours more sleep.

8 a.m. Wake up all the children for school. Another blood sugar test for Adrianna and Joey. I help them administer their long-acting insulin and give them fast-acting insulin if needed. After breakfast, I herd the cats and get all four of them off to school.

I prepare their lunches to take to their schools. While Adrianna and Joey are at school, they will check their blood sugar every two hours, starting at 10:30 a.m.

12:30 p.m. I go to Adrianna’s school. We discuss her day so far – health, school, and whatever else is on her mind. Then, we check her blood sugar and discuss what she has eaten. It’s important to talk about what has gone on and what activities she has taken part in, such as dance and gym class. How active she has been impacts her blood sugar levels.  I bring my children a hot lunch every day so they know exactly how many carbohydrates they are eating; this is a key measurement to know exactly how to adjust their fast-acting insulin after lunch and throughout the afternoon. 

1 p.m. I meet Joey at home, as he comes home every day for lunch. As with Adrianna, we talk about his day, what he’s been eating and doing throughout so far. Tracking their daily habits and food intake develops good habits that reduces their sick days so they don’t miss school. 

1:30 p.m. I drop Joey back off at school.

3 p.m. I pick up Adrianna and we do a blood test. Next, I pick up Joey and do a blood test on him. I have snacks handy if their blood sugar is low and needs a boost. We rush home, they change, have a quick bite to eat and then one or more of them gets ready for an extracurricular activity.

4:30 p.m. We’re in the car ready to leave. Joey goes to four hours of gymnastics with his brother on Monday, Wednesday and Saturdays. He has snacks in case his blood sugar starts to drop. He can test his blood sugar on his own while he is there. Adrianna goes to gymnastics Tuesdays and Thursdays and follows the same schedule as Joey. Her other extracurricular activity is swimming.

9 p.m. After gymnastics, Joey and Adrianna come home and put their insulin pump back on. They recheck their blood sugar levels and have a hearty meal. Joey’s favourite is a hamburger.  

9:30 p.m. Time for them to wind down.

10 p.m. Bedtime!

It’s a busy day for them – and for me. I want them to have an active lifestyle because it keeps them healthy and shows them that type 1 diabetes does not slow them down or stop them from doing anything else that someone their age can do.

Amy Crespi poses above with her children, Maya, Ezra, Joey and Adrianna, in Dr. Frederick Banting’s room at Banting House).

Andrew Cairns is a freelance writer who graduated from the public relations program at Seneca College in Toronto, and who, as a volunteer with the CDA, wrote Amy Crespi’s story. He hopes to work with a non-profit organization in future.

What are your days like as a parent of a child or children living with diabetes? Visit our myCDA community forums and share now.

Do you have a personal story of how a diabetes diagnosis has affected you or someone you know? Fill in our easy personal story submission form, and you and your story could appear in myCDA community content.





Help, I’ve been diagnosed with diabetes! What do I do now?

Help, I’ve been diagnosed with diabetes! What do I do now?
Picture of Denise Barnard
Posted by: Denise Barnard
Posted on: August 25, 2016

Do I have to exercise daily? Do I have to lose weight? How do I even begin to do that? What can I or can’t I eat? I’m overwhelmed by all the information out there. Where do I start?

Whether you’re newly diagnosed or you’ve been living with the disease for years, join our live Tweetchat and get your burning questions answered by Dr. Ali Zentner, featured speaker at this fall’s national CDA Expos.

When: Wednesday, September 7, 2016, from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. EST

Where: Twitter (@DiabetesAssoc)

How: Login using your own Twitter account

Follow our hashtag #CDAExpoChat and tweet your questions to @DiabetesAssoc. You can also send questions in advance (by Friday, September 2) to socialmedia@diabetes.ca. For more information and updates, follow us on Facebook.

Do you have a personal story of how diabetes has touched you or someone you know? Fill in our easy personal story submission form, and you and your story could appear in myCDA community content. 

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned about living with diabetes since your diagnosis? Visit our myCDA community forums and share now.





Calling all pasta lovers! Watch this recipe video for easy-to-make linguine with tomatoes

Calling all pasta lovers! Watch this recipe video for easy-to-make linguine with tomatoes
Picture of Denise Barnard
Posted by: Denise Barnard
Posted on: August 23, 2016

Seven is the lucky number with this delicious Linguine with Oven-Dried Tomatoes and Roasted Garlic recipe from the Summer 2016 issue of Diabetes Dialogue – seven ingredients and seven steps to a dish that’s packed with protein, fibre, vitamins, and of course, flavour. Enjoy and let us know what you (and your guests) think!

Subscribe now for Nutrition Matters recipe videos and more from Diabetes Dialogue today!

Do you have a personal story of how diabetes has touched you or someone you know? Fill in our easy personal story submission form, and you and your story could appear in myCDA community content.  

What’s your favourite way to enjoy tomatoes? Visit our myCDA community forums and share now.